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orchestrated his abuse and death. prosecutors also indicted her husband, sister-in-law and sons. investigators say victims were held in her condo against their will, deprived of food and water and physically abused before they died. in most cases they say relatives of the victims were the ones who carried out the abuse. police have found five bodies. they believe four other people who are listed as missing are connected to this case and likely dead. >>> investigators say sumida's crimes could date back a decade. during that time citizens and police had warning signs but they didn't act. lax law enforcement is partly to blame but so is japanese tendency to respect privacy. earlier i spoke with nhk world's yoichiro tateiwa who is covering this story. yoichiro, how didn't this case come to light? >> it first came up a year ago when a woman fled to a police station and said she had been kidnapped and held against her will. since then the police have found dead bodies in different parts of western japan. investigators say sumida was the mastermind behind the deaths. here is how they say it worked.
off on that document bit by bit. they voted controversially to keep islamic law as the main source of legislation. most of the political opposition is boycotting the assembly. the document aims to transfer more power to egypt's parliament. critics say it is being rammed through too hastily. critics have already gathered where the president is expected to make an announcement. british lawmakers are looking at new ways to regulate the press. the calls for tougher guidelines come after an enquiry's report on crimes committed by reporters as they sought out sensational news stories. >> the inquiry picked up its work after 10 reporters were arrested at rupert murdoch's "news of the world" newspaper. among the charges, bribing the police. the inquiry has found the violations span decades. >> as the inquiry findings were read, activists gathered to protest what they termed robert murdoch's media mafia. the report found that reporters had routinely -- routinely packed into phones of celebrities. it has led to scores of arrests and some criminal charges. as a result, he said -- than of the
, a move to end the crisis. >> the document is based on sharia law. critics say it ignores fundamental democratic principles and marginalizes the nation's large christian populations. it has set the stage for conflict in a more increasingly divided nation. >> opponents of the president are outraged at the document adopted by the assembly. protesters are maintaining a vigil, and demonstrations are growing. critics warn that egypt is fast becoming an islamic state. >> hosni mubarak never divided the egyptian people. now, there is president morsi, and we do not know if he is the president of egypt or the president of the muslim brotherhood. >> islamists who dominate the assembly have already answered that question -- the body signed off on all 234 articles of the constitution, which is based upon the principles of sharia or islamic law. the constitution maintains sharia as the main source of legislation. it also gives women no guarantee of equal rights, since the rights must conform with sharia. religious leaders will also be able to directly influence egyptian legislation in the future.
to the law. the largest opposition leader aung san suu kyi went to the site on thursday night. she called on both sides to seek settlement. >> translator: i want to solve this problem peacefully and in a dignified manner. i want to request that all of you help me on this. >> reporter: the copper mine is being jointly developed by chinese company and the firm linked to the military. the decision to force an end to the demonstration was likely made out of consideration for china. infrastructure projects including the new airport have benefitted from chinese money. the two countries built cross ties for myanmar and constrained by western sanctions. investments from china totalled $1.4 billion over the past two decades. but myanmar has been reducing its dependence on china, shifting its focus towards the united states and europe. democratic and economic reforms have encouraged the west to end sanctions. china and the united states are competing for influence in southeast asia. myanmar's per capita gdp is aamong the lowest in asean. the country may be exploring ways to develop its economy quic
. a controversial mining law calls for higher taxes and guarantees the state a 15% share in the mining enterprise. >> the new mining law has not been a bad thing. it preserves the interests of the guineans, but we've not driven away foreign investors. the proof is that they continue to be here every day. the interests of the investors are taken into account because they are very important for us. those who show confidence in guinea, and put their capital here, should be compensated properly and find political stability. >> by evening the freight train from the capital conakry has finally arrived at the mine. it's hours late due to problems unloading the last batch of ore. the rain caused the bauxite in the open cars to clump together. the shift supervisor urges the loading workers to hurry. a phone call from the harbor. a ship is waiting to take the bauxite to ukraine for processing. guinea has no aluminum plant of its own -- another reason why this country profits so little from its vast mineral resource. >> and that's all we have time for on this edition of global 3000. if you want to get in to
with security, the situation in the countryside, and the rule of law in afghanistan. i asked our expert on afghanistan if germany was pulling out troops to soon. >> it depends on the definition of the job done. it is clear that nato has agreed upon a time table to leave afghanistan until 2014, and germany's decision is part of this overarching schedule for afghanistan. however, 2014 is a compromise between the situation of afghanistan, what is needed in afghanistan, and what is the political situation in germany, and what can be communicated to the german public. so the compromise is 2014, but it becomes more and more clear germany will be in afghanistan even after that date with a diminished role. may be 1000 or 500 soldiers. >> the report also says there's been little progress in reconciliation and peace efforts with the taliban. why? >> with some efforts for negotiations between the government in kabul and the range of insurgents, but without success. the second part of the negotiation process failed as well at times to negotiate between the taliban and the government, and that leads
pesticides that exceed the law. they pulled about 900 tons off the province. authorities and officials say the pesticide levels do not pose a health risk even for people who consume the tea daily. >>> archaeologists say they've made an important finding that could alter the history of japan's system of riding. they say they found earthen ware that suggests that hiragana characters could date back farther than currently believed. last year's archaeologists in the ancient capital of kyoto excavated 20 plates and other pottery items from the ruins of the home of an aristocrat. they say it dates back to the late 9th century. hirogana has believed to have become an established form of writing in the 10th century. >> translator: a large amount of earthen ware was discovered in the home of a noble family. this means the aristocrats of the time already had a good command of hiragana. >> they say it ho provides precious clues to how it involved in japan. >>> visitors to kyoto at this time of year enjoy its gardens and temples against a backdrop of colorful autumn leaves. nhk world's rina nakano vis
of a government that is refusing them compensation. under a law passed in 2007, the former dissidents are entitled to 14 euros for every day they spent in jail. most of the men have received only a fraction of that. we go to meet his father. the government has allotted him a room. the toilets down the corridor are hardly more than holes in the floor, and they stink. the father was also a victim of the dictatorship. he says the political prisoners were exploited and lost their property. >> i had a house in the center of town -- two bedrooms, a living room, with a big garden. today, there are three or four apartment buildings there. >> albania is celebrating 100 years of independence. flags lined the streets of the capital. the country wants to move closer to the rest of europe, and 11,000 former political prisoners are bad publicity. the main governing party says the hunger strike was opposite -- was orchestrated by the opposition. >> these actions are not normal. in fact, they are simply undemocratic. they are getting people to commit these actions for political motives. in this case, it is specif
, but so far, it has been in vain. now he fears animal protection laws will become more lax than the real danger here is that some groups will see the crisis as an opportunity for turning back time. in terms of environmental protection and hunting as well. >> in crisis-wracked spain, the desperation to create jobs is producing questionable business models like providing a license to kill wild boars with lances. economic considerations aside, animal rights activists insist the practice does not present a pretty picture. >> i'm sure you will have your own views on that one. as a euro crisis crimes on, people all over europe are looking for safer ways to invest their money. in many countries, they believe the answer lies in property. property prices on many big cities are still booming, and that means there is a shortage of affordable housing for students or low-income families. people being priced out of a home has become a major problem in hamburg in germany with many people forced to live with relatives or to commute long distances to work or study in the city center. the challenge now is
in east jerusalem and the west bank. the settlements are considered illegal under international law. the israelis say they also launched a product to business housing on the outskirts of jerusalem. they say it could hinder the peace process. palestinian president refused to negotiate with israel while settlement construction continues. the white house has condemned the israeli government's decision. and national security council's spokesperson. the official says israel's action is powerful. >> opponents of egyptian president mohamed morsi is wrapping up the pressure against the country's new draft constitution. they've gathered in the tens of thousands to speak out against what they call another power grab by morsi and his allies. the demonstrators are occupying tahrir square in cairo. they say the voting on the draft wasn't fair. they argue the council is dominated by those who support president morsi. >> translator: we will never be forced to approve the constitution. >> translator: the draft constitution does not represent the will of all egyptians. >> members of the council unan
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10